Purslane Salad with Yogurt (Yoğurtlu Semizotu Salatası)


























When I was 7 or 8 years old, purslane was introduced to me as one of the cousins of spinach, namely its aunt's daughter. Since I loved spinach very much, my parents introduced every other green leaf to me as a member of extended spinach family. Purslane grew on me in time, and ascended to the throne of spinach. During my dad's futile trials of having a lawn, one batch of grass seeds came mixed with purslane seeds! We never had a lawn, but we had delicious purslane for many summers. In Turkish cuisine we use purslane raw in salads or cook them just like spinach. It has a sweet and sour delicious taste.

You can find purslane--it's also called verdolaga--at Mexican or Latin American markets here in the States or in your yard.


























purslane, washed and leaves picked
yogurt, enough to cover purlane leaves
as much garlic as you want, minced
salt

optional
crushed red pepper flakes

olive oil, a couple of drops

-Mix yogurt, salt, and garlic in a bowl.
-Add purslane to this mixture.

15 comments:

  1. My brother also loved spinach, so my mother passed as spinach some greens that were not. It worked. I have never had purslane. This recipe sounds refreshing.

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  2. Really interesting. This grows as a weed here. One summer I picked some out from the weeds in my garden and it was very tasty.

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  3. Kalyn is right and we pick purslane out of our lawns as a weed. I never would have known that you can eat it. Dandelions grow in the lawn as well...Hmmm a purslane and dandelion salad mixed in with some nice mesclun salad greens...and yogurt..I must say that does sound tempting :D

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  4. I want to have purslane as weed in my yard, too.

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  5. Glad to find out the English for semizotu, which I love; and this is the way my mum serves it too. I hope to find purslane in Melbourne sometime soon.

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  6. I live in Kentucky, and the dirt is very fertile here...Lots of wild edible weeds that made it to my dinner table...My favorite green is purslane! Of course, i am Turkish and I don't know anyone that doesn't like purslane in Turkey..For any spinach dishes, purslane can be subsituded...this recipe is very light and refreshing during hot summer days...Also, it can be cooked with ground beef, lemon juice and tomato paste...I cook it with cheese n eggs, with pasta, potato salads, chicken salad, etc...It has high level of vitamins and minerals...Enjoy one of best greens in the world...

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  7. Anonymous3:43 PM

    wow. i'm just discovering this fantastic plant. i'm excited to try the simple yogurt, garlic, and purslane salad. thanks!

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  8. We have used purslane for a long time in my home town, Its called Gol Ki Bhaji. Unfortunately I think its the local name and hence no one knew what that was around here...Finally I found the english/botanical name thanks to the internet. I tried growing it in pots, but :( they always wither away. Any tips ???

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  9. greengrl-unfortunately I never tried to grow purslane; we either got it from farmer's market or it grew in the yard uninvited. But I know it needs a lot of sun and water.

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  10. To GREENGRL: Try to grow something else. Water once a week lightly. Everything else will die but your purslane will thrive with or without fertilizer, in sun or shade. Once you get some growing, break it up with a hoe. Spray it with broadleaf weed killer, it loves it. That's been my approach for years here in San Antonio and probably could grow 500 pounds or so in 100 square feet if I let it run wild.

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  11. Thanks for this recipe! I'm Canadian, living in Turkey, and looove this simple dish. I picked a bunch of semizotu yesterday and wanted to make this. And now I know the name of the green in English too. Thanks!!!

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  12. Anonymous9:53 AM

    Try it with cucumbers, some lemon juice and olive oil just as a salad.

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  13. Hi Burcu,
    If you don't remember me, I was in your Turkish course a few years ago. I'm going to Koç now and relying on your blog to get my cooking up to speed with the grocery store. This salad was great!

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  14. Hi Nick, of course I remember you! Nice to hear from you, I hope you're enjoying your time at Koc and in Turkey. How long are you gonna be there?

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  15. Anonymous1:21 AM

    Purslane Mmmm sounds yummy must try some

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