Herby Black-eyed Pea (Zeytinyağlı Börülce)






I've been looking for pomegranate molasses/syrup for a long time to make tabbouleh (kısır). Finally I found a Lebanese one in an international market. Pomegranate syrup is an essential ingredient in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cooking. It's delicious as a salad dressing ingredient as well as a base for marinade. Now that I found it I'll use it more, but first I used it on black-eyed pea which both as a dish and as a salad is very common in the Aegean coast of Turkey.

2 cups fresh black-eyed peas
1 big onion, finely chopped
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 red pepper, chopped
1/4 cup olive oil
1/2 bunch parsley, chopped
1 bunch dill, chopped
1 tbsp sumac
1 tbsp dried mint flakes
1 tsp sugar
1 cup water

1 tsp pomegranate molasses/syrup or lemon juice

-Wash fresh black-eyed peas and boil them in 4-5 cups of water for 5 minutes. Drain and wash well.
-Mix all the ingredients except for pomegranate molasses in a broad pot. Bring to a boil and then on low cover and cook until peas soak water (approximately 30 minutes)
-Dress to your taste with pomegranate syrup before serving. It will give it a really nice sweet and sour flavor. If you cannot find pomegranate syrup, you use lemon juice.

If you want to have your black-eyed peas as a salad, all you need to do is to cook the peas until soft and wash them well. Skip sugar and onion from ingredients, instead add 1 bunch chopped green onions. Mix everything well in a bowl and dress with either pomegranate syrup or lemon juice.

This recipe with parsley and dill (my favorites) is perfect for Weekend Herb Blogging which was founded by Kalyn and is hosted by Scott of Real Epicurean this weekend.

11 comments:

  1. Burcu, I envy you that you can find fresh ones there.. You lucky girl..

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  2. Burcu, I always have one bottle of pomegranate molasses on hand. Simply adore it!Your salad looks very nice and refreshing! :D

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  3. Betul, you're right it was pure luck! I had never seen them here fresh before. You might get lucky, too.

    Ahn, I absolutely love the flavor of pomegranate molasses. Tabbouleh is best with it.

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  4. I've never heard of Pomegranate Syrup before, and it really does sound delicious!

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  5. Thank you for this!!! I have a bottle of pomegranite molasses and I love using it. But, I don't have many recipes. And I also love black eyed peas, so I was quite happy to see this post!

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  6. Anonymous5:25 AM

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    SPION.

    http://spion.punt.nl

    ReplyDelete
  7. Fantastic post. I've heard of poemgranate syrup but never seen it for sale. This sounds like an interesting combination of tastes. I'm very fond of sumac. One of my favorite places in Salt Lake has it on the table in shakers like salt.

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  8. we make black eyed beans in an entirely different way. I thot tabbouleh is made with cous cous only. I have to ge tmy hands on soem pome juice now.

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  9. Kalyn, in Turkey all the kebap restaurants gave sumac on the table. I love it, too. I usually use it on my salad: just sprinkle it over. It really makes a difference.

    Mallugirl, yes you're right; tabbouleh is made with fine bulgur. We like our tabbouleh sour and in some places of Turkey, people prefer using pomegranate syrup to lemons, because it's in a way more sour.

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  10. I can say it looks lovely and sounds delicious, but I'm pretty sure I can get neither the black-eyed peas nor the pomegranite molasses...
    Maybe if I ever get to a city....or Turkey

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  11. I made this last year for my annual Church-wide picnic. IT WAS A HIT!

    I too kept sneaking into the fridge to test it every 10 minutes while it was setting.

    I did double the receipe and added more bacon for flavor!

    THANK YOU and God Bless!

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